Who we are

Missionaries of the Sacred Heart, an Australian community, in a worldwide religious congregation.

Ministry Mission

Jesus loved with a human heart: with him we proclaim his love to the world.

Peace, Justice, Creation

We work to discover through advocacy, healing and reconciliation, God's presence in our world.

Spirituality

We are to be on earth the heart of God. God has no other heart but ours.

Current News

WINNERS, AUSTRALIAN CATHOLIC FILM OFFICE

MSC Brothers and Priests, OLSH Sisters and many lay missionaries served indigenous people in Central Australia, at Arltunga, Santa Teresa, Alice Springs parish, for many decades.

sweet country poster

Sweet Country offers an opportunity to raise Australian consciousness about black-white history – and to better appreciate contemporary aspirations.

jirga poster

Jirga is set in Afghanistan, again questions for Australians and issues of military presence. Religious educators will find it a helpful film for understanding the Sacrament of Reconciliation.

PRESS RELEASE

SWEET COUNTRY

named

‘Australian Film of the Year’

by the Catholic Film Office

ACFO

The jury of the Australian Catholic Office for Film & Broadcasting has awarded its annual prize to Warwick Thornton’s SWEET COUNTRY.

The film is set in 1929 in the outback of Australia’s Northern Territory, and tells the story of an  Indigenous farmhand, Sam Kelly (Hamilton Morris), who kills a white man in self-defence, and goes on the run from a small posse group, led by Sergeant Fletcher (Bryan Brown), which pursues him to hunt him down. Sam is befriended by a concerned Christian preacher (Sam Neill).

sweet country

The film is based on true events, and the director of the movie is Indigenous. It targets black humiliation and white racism, and depicts terrible injustice in a country hostile to Indigenous peoples. Warwick Thornton directs a movie with historical and emotive significance, the film suggesting strongly that racism is still prevalent in a “sweet country”, called Australia.

It has striking images of the outback, and its cinematography is exceptional. Under Thornton’s assured direction scenes of the outback capture the isolation and harshness of the land brilliantly.

This is a powerful film of Indigenous hardship and injustice at an important period in Australia’s history. The movie argues persuasively that Australians can live a much better life in the future by knowing and understanding the deep pain and tragedy of its past.

jirga

The Jury also commended Benjamin Gilmour’s Jirga.

Richard Leonard SJ, Director

Peter Malone MSC

Callum Ryan

Peter Sheehan